Archive for February, 2018

Sustainable Travel Leap

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018

 

Looking for ways to tread lightly on the earth when you travel? Try green-certified independent inns to start, and then ask the innkeepers for recommendations on locally owned shops and restaurants.

Spring always seems like the ideal time to talk about eco-lodging, what with Mother Nature waking from winter slumber, delicate plants and edibles poking through the once ice-crackled earth, and travelers eager to inhale the fresh air and exhale wind-chill hangovers.

 

 

Here in Wisconsin, we have a voluntary certification program called “Travel Green Wisconsin,” and we’re proud to say the Wisconsin B&B Association was a pioneer in this movement to promote eco-friendly travel. Among the many inns that are certified are Lake Ripley Lodge B&B in Cambridge with their new rain gardens boasting Native Wisconsin wildflowers, and Crystal River Inn in Waupaca, who serve food from their garden, harvest local wild fruit, and make all their jellies and jams.

Lake Ripley Lodge B&B

View from Crystal River Inn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going above and beyond what Travel Green Wisconsin requires are Pinehurst Inn B&B in Bayfield, which was named one of the “Top 10 Eco-friendly Inns” by BedandBreakfast.com and received the 2014 Wisconsin Governor’s Stewardship Award, and Artha Sustainable Living Center in Amherst, where guests appreciate local, organic food and are welcome to attend the yoga studio’s weekly classes.

You can find a more complete list of travel green certified inns on our website.

Pinehurst Inn

Artha Sustainable Living Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But the Wisconsin B&B Association’s commitment to the environment doesn’t stop there. We’re also proponents of “conscious travel,” with innkeepers always happy to suggest ideas for shopping local, dining at locally owned restaurants, and visiting attractions that preserve the history and culture of the community.

We’re all in this together!

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Where the Rapids Are

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

 

If you prefer lazy rivers over whitewater rapids, then this story isn’t for you. However, if you love an adrenaline rush, try rafting in the spring when the waters are high.

Adventure travel has a cousin and it is achievement travel. If rushing through whitewater rapids is on your to-accomplish list, then Wisconsin’s Peshtigo and Wolf rivers should both be on your radar. Spring is the time, when some rapids reach Class IV status. Translation: Look out for rocks and drops, and sharp maneuvers may be needed.

Peshtigo River riffles

The Peshtigo River State Forest offers 25 miles of river and more than 9,000 acres of forest, making it a natural gem of Marinette County. Here’s a little tidbit: It was established in 2001, making it Wisconsin’s newest state forest. And here’s why it should be on every paddler’s list: It is the Midwest’s longest continuous whitewater rapids. According to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the short Roaring Rapids section of the Peshtigo River, Farm Dam Landing to Boat Landing #12, is for skilled paddlers only.

Dalles of Wolf River

The Wolf River is another waterway that earns “premier” status among paddlers. Its path tracks 240 miles north to south, from Forest County to Winnebago County. A super-rugged 37-mile upper stretch between Lily and Big Smokey Falls is not for rookies.

Eagle Harbor Inn

White Gull Inn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a wild day on either river, head to a peaceful B&B in the adjacent Door County, separated from Forest and Marinette counties by another body of water, Green Bay. Enjoy White Gull Inn in Fish Creek, a historic coastal village with a natural harbor that separates it from Peninsula State Park , and Eagle Harbor Inn, who are proud to be part of the landscape of picturesque Ephraim. You can also find a complete list of Door County Inns on the WBBA website.

 

WBBA Seek the Unique

Are you ready to Seek the Unique?